To my colleagues, on the death of their students’ grandmother(s)

I’ve re-blogged this article because it is a fantastic response to this other, terrible article published in the Chronicle of Higher Education (http://www.chronicle.com/article/To-My-Student-on-the-Death-/240353).

Students can be annoying, and flaky, and sometimes they’re telling porkies, but 99% of them are working hard 100% of the time, and rely on us for support- scholarly or otherwise. As educators we are here to support their learning, and this means if someone says their grandmother has died, we give them the support they ask for, and don’t mock them on the internet.

Tenure, She Wrote

It’s entirely possible that I’m just not cool enough to enjoy this “humorous,” “fictional” take on the the phenomena of students manufacturing dead grandmothers during finals week. Maybe it’s because my own grandmother died while I was in college, my grandfather died while I was in grad school, or another grandmother died in while I was in grad school  (are you keeping track? That’s two grandmothers). I missed her funeral to go to a postdoc interview, which is what she would have wanted (I got the job). As the child of divorced, remarried parents, I had four grandmothers, so if I was so unlucky as to have more than one die during the course of your class, then, gee, I guess I’d be in a pickle!

But seriously, I do not get the mentality of seeing your students as adversaries. I don’t get the need to dehumanize them with your…

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My MP replied to my letter about #tampontax

Over 24 hours after sending my email I’ve had a reply. I’m not really satisfied, because I think that a majority on this vote could have taken the issue to the EU with more credibility.

We negotiated with the EU in 2000 and got the tax cut from 17.5% to 5%, and I firmly believe that with enough support and campaigning we could remove the tax completely…across the EU. Why should UK women have more privilege regarding sanitary products compared to women of other EU member states?

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What Psychology Journal Editors Really Do (Really?)

I found this article when searching online to find ways to get involved and work with journals other than doing peer-review…food for thought!

(For clarification, this is satirical and in no way represents what editors actually do!)

My Perspectives (on PsychScience)

A while back I posted the following on a private site.  It got some interesting responses.

I find this [previous] discussion of editorial motives and behavior very interesting.  I am about to break the code of silence here; please don’t spread this around and get me into trouble.

Among the things you guys seem not to know: After you are appointed the editor of a major psychology journal, you are invited to editor boot camp.  This is a three-day retreat in which you learn how to do the job.

Day 1 was mostly an overview of the “system” – the roles people play (from publishers to reviewers to authors), the stages of publication, and the various electronic systems that are used.  Then there was a short section about reviewers – how to select, treat, cajole, and reward them.

Day 2 was about dealing with authors.

The first part was about initial submissions: How…

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